Reading List: Native American Heritage Month and Transgender Awareness Week

The November 2018 Reading List was curated by Denise Nichole, Editor in Chief of The Hellebore. Read below for the latest articles and revelations in literary publishing and global news. 

Native American Heritage Month

The history of the United States reflects the erasure and genocide of an entire demographic of people who are still subjected to discrimination, economic disparity, and mental health risks. Native American Heritage Month honors the legacy of indigenous people through an honest conversation of politics, society- and a rich exploration of traditions, culture, and customs.

Thanksgiving: The National Day of Mourning by Allen Salway via PAPER Magazine

To me, Thanksgiving is a reminder of our resistance as Indigenous People navigating this settler society that continuously tries to erase and destroy us, yet we are still here. I will spend it honoring my ancestors and their fight for survival.

Contemporary Native American Poetry Essentials by Dean Rader via Ploughshares

She had some horses who were bodies of sand.
She had some horses who were maps drawn of blood.
She had some horses who were skins of ocean water.
She had some horses who were the blue air of sky.
She had some horses who were fur and teeth.
She had some horses who were clay and would break.
She had some horses who were splintered red cliff.

– Joy Harjo

“She Had Some Horses”

Transgender Awareness Week

Transgender Awareness Week focuses on the experiences of transgender and non-binary people. It is a week to honor the lives that have been lost to anti-trans violence and hate crimes (Transgender Day of Remembrance). It is a week to share stories of triumph and heartache. During this week various organizations, websites, and individuals bring awareness to the discrimination transgender people face, and advocate for lasting change in society.

The Gap Between Glamour and Death for Trans Women of Color by Denny

For trans women of color, representation is a polarizing topic. There are the well-known trans women of color we admire, and there are those we mourn for. It is easy to be inspired to do great things by the former, and it’s easy to see the latter as evidence of the fact that many of us are in constant danger. But what lies between these extremes of fame and death? Do I have to die in order to matter? Do I have to become a celebrity? I’m stuck between feeling like I need to be beautiful in order to be taken seriously, and feeling like I need to be invisible to be safe.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *